Eve Boyle

Eve Boyle

Email:
eboyle@gwu.edu

Eve Boyle is interested in the evolution of the human diet, and when and how changes in body form occurred across hominin evolution. Her dissertation research will explore whether or not there is a relationship between diet and the bones of the pelvis and thorax in primates. Other research interests include the comparative morphology of the hominoid foot and ankle. 

Education

BA, Anthropology, Summa Cum Laude, Boston University, 2014


Year Entered GW Program: 2014

Advisors: Sergio Almécija and Bernard Wood

Publications

Journal articles: 

Wilson A, Miller C, Klein B, Taylor M, Goodwin M, Boyle EK, Brown K, Hoppe C, and Lazarus M. 2017. A meta-analysis of anatomy laboratory pedagogies. Clinical Anatomy. doi:10.1002/ca.22934 

Wood B and Boyle EK. 2016. Hominin taxic diversity: Fact or fantasy?. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 159 (S61): S37–S78. 

Boyle EK and DeSilva JM. 2015. A Large Homo erectus Talus From Koobi Fora, Kenya (KNM-ER 5428) and Pleistocene Hominin Talar Evolution. PaleoAnthropology 2015:1-13. 

Book chapters:

Boyle EK and Wood B. 2016. Human evolutionary history. In Evolution of Nervous Systems 2e, Volume 4: The Evolution of the Human Brain: Apes and other Ancestors, ed. Preuss TM. Elsevier. 

Wood B and Boyle EK. 2016. Diversity in paleohumans: the evolutionary origin of the hominins. In On Human Nature 1e, Part 1: Biological basis of human diversity, eds. Tibayrenc M. & Ayala FJ. Elsevier. 

Conference abstracts:

Boyle EK, Almécija SA. 2017. A macroevolutionary perspective on human gut proportions. 86th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 162: S64.128.

Wilson A, Miller C, Klein B, Taylor M, Goodwin M, Boyle E, Brown K, Hoppe C, and Lazarus M. 2017. A 50 year review and meta-analysis of anatomy laboratory pedagogies. The FASEB Journal 31: S392.1.  

Boyle EK, Bernardoni DM, Schneider AL. 2016. The effect of naturally inclined substrates on foot strike position in a habitually unshod population. 85th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 159: 101. 

Swanson ZS, DeSilva JM, Boyle EK, Joseph KM, McNutt EJ. 2016. Variation in Lateral Plantar Process Position and Functional Implications in Living Humans. 85th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 159: 308. 

Wood B and Boyle EK. Hominin Taxic Diversity: Fact or Fantasy? 2016. 85th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 159: 338. 

Brennan EJ, Boyle EK, Pobiner B. 2016. Identifying diagnostic criteria on cut marked bone: A methodological comparison. PaleoAnthropology Society Annual Meeting, 2016. 

Boyle EK, Zipfel B, DeSilva JM. 2015. Variation in lateral plantar process morphology and implications for Australopithecus. 84th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 156: 91. 

Research Experience

2017 – present Visiting researcher: Primate postcranial collections, Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History. 

2016 – 2017 Meta-analysis of gross anatomy laboratory pedagogies, PIs: Adam Wilson, Kirsten Brown, and Michelle Lazarus.

2016 – present Evaluating convergence in gut organ surface area proportions in primates and mammals within a macroevolutionary framework, with Sergio Almécija.

2015 – 2016 Identifying diagnostic criteria on cut marked bone butchered by experts and novices, with Briana Pobiner and Emily Brennan.

2014 – present Quantifying calcaneal lateral process position in apes and fossil hominins, with Jeremy DeSilva.

2015 Koobi Fora Field School Staff Assistant and Researcher, Koobi Fora, East Turkana, Kenya

2013. Undergraduate Researcher, DeSilva Paleoanthropology Lab, Boston University. Senior project: “A large Homo erectus talus from Koobi Fora, Kenya (KNM-ER 5428), and Pleistocene hominin talar evolution.” Advisor: Jeremy DeSilva.

2013 Turkana Basin Institute Field School, West Turkana, Kenya, Stony Brook University


CASHP Blog Entries

A Beginner's Guide to Poster Presentations

GW Women in STEM First Annual Symposium – Hopefully the First of Many

Moving Forward

Distinctions

2016 NSF Graduate Research Fellowship ($34,000/year for 3 years)

2015 Faculty and Staff Innovation Grant: “GW Women in STEM First Annual Symposium” Shenkman Career Services Fund, The George Washington University ($1,655)

2015 Zelma Reidling Warren Bannister and William Warren Graduate Fellowship Award for field travel expenses (Koobi Fora, Kenya) ($875)

2014 Award for Excellence in Anthropology, Boston University