Laurence Dumouchel

Laurence Dumouchel

Email:
ldumouchel@gwmail.gwu.edu

Laurence Dumouchel’s research focuses on reconstructing the environmental conditions in which our ancestors evolved. Specifically, she works on East African animal fossils associated with the environments of Australopithecus anamensis, an early bipedal hominin. 

Education

BS, Anthropology, Université de Montréal, 2011
MS, Biological Anthropology, Université de Montréal, 2013
MPhil, Human Paleobiology, The George Washington University, 2015


Year Entered GW Program: 2013
Advisor: René Bobe

Publications

Drapeau MSM, Bobe R, Wynn JG, Campisano CJ, Dumouchel L and Geraads D (2014) The Omo Mursi Formation: A window into the East African Pliocene, Journal of Human Evolution, 75:64-79.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhevol.2014.07.001
 
Conference Abstracts:

Dumouchel L and Manthi FK, Ecological niche selectivity in Australopithecus anamensis. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 156:111.

Dumouchel L and Drapeau MSM (2014) Taphonomic study of the fossil fauna from the Mursi Formation and Member A of the Shungura Formation, Ethiopia. American Journal of Physical Anthropology S58: 110.

 

Research Experience

2016  Visiting Researcher: Allia Bay and Kanapoi faunal collections, National Museums of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya

2016  Visiting Researcher: Mursi collection, National Museum of Ethiopia, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

2016  Visiting Researcher: Tragelaphine ecomorphology by photogrammetry, Museum Support Center, Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History

2015  Visiting Researcher: Pliocene bovids from Allia Bay, National Museums of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya

2014  West Turkane Paleoproject Research Student, Kanapoi, West Turkana, Kenya

2014  Koobi Fora Field School Staff Assistant and Researcher, Koobi Fora, East Turkana, Kenya

2014  Taphonomy analysis of zebra bones (actualistic study), Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History

2013  Master’s Thesis: ”Taphononic Sutdy of the Fossil Fauna from the Mursi formation and the member A of the Shungura formation, Ethiopia”. Université de Montréal, Advisor: Dr. Michelle Drapeau

2012  Laboratory work, Faunal fossils taphonomy analysis, National Museum of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

2011  Archaeology field school, Droulers-Tsiionhiakwatha site, St-Anicet, Canada

2010  Archaeology field school, Argilos. Greek-Canadian archaeological excavation, Greece

Distinctions

2016  Sigma Xi Grants-in-Aid of Research, "The environments of the earliest Australopithecus" ($869)
 
2016  The Leakey Foundation, "The environments of the earliest obligate biped, Australopithecus anamensi" ($13,380)
 
2016  The Explorer's Club, Washington Group, Inc., "What the world looked like when we started walking upright: the environments of the earliest Australopithecus" ($3,281)
 
2016  Evolving Earth Foundation, "What the world looked like when we started walking upright: the environments of the earliest Australopithecus" ($2,935)
 
2016  Lewis N. Cotlow Fund, "What the world looked like when we started walking upright: the environments of the earliest Australopithecus" ($1,750)
 
2016  Cosmos Club Foundation Henry H. Work Science Award, "The environments of the earliest Australopithecus" ($3,700)
 
2015  Paleoecology Symposium, Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Travel Award ($200)
 
2014  Zelma Reidling Warren Bannister and William Warren Graduate Fellowship Award for field travel expenses (Koobi Fora, Kenya) ($1,950)
 
2014  The Explorers Club, Exploration Fund, “Comparative Taphonomy of Pliocene sites of East Africa” ($1,500)
 
2013  Joseph-Arthur-Gendron scholarship, Caisse Desjardins Châteauguay, Canada ($3000)
 
2011  Entrance scholarship, Université de Montréal ($1000)