A graduate student in the CASHP Neuroscience lab analyzing a brain sample with his laptop

Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology

 

 

Senior biological anthropology major Thea Anderson uses imaging software to examine the distinctive eyepatches of the red-bellied lemur for her Luther Rice research.

Thea Anderson (BS '19) uses imaging software to examine the distinctive eyepatches of the red-bellied lemur in Associate Professor of Anthropology Brenda Bradley’s Primate Genomics Lab.

Housed within the George Washington University's Department of Anthropology, the Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology (CASHP) brings together researchers to advance our understanding of human evolution and primate biology. CASHP's programs are rooted in the belief that investigating human origins requires interdisciplinary collaboration within inclusive intellectual communities of scholars representing diverse backgrounds, experiences, and perspectives.

Our work draws on expertise across the scientific disciplines, including archaeology, genetics, primate behavioral biology, social psychology, developmental biology, neuroscience, and paleoanthropology.

CASHP’s scholars are internationally recognized for their breakthroughs in the laboratory and at field sites around the world. They also teach and collaborate with students pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Biological AnthropologyMaster of Science in Human Paleobiology or a Doctorate in Human Paleobiology.

 

 

 


Research Labs

 

 


CASHP at a Glance

3,000

Square feet of laboratory space in the state-of-the-art Science and Engineering Hall

5

High-powered microscopes for sophisticated sample analysis

1,000

Brain specimens from chimpanzees, tigers, giraffes and more

3,000+

Human osteological specimens and hominin fossil casts

 


Head shot of Victoria Lockwood, a Phd Candidate in Human Paleobiology

Victoria Lockwood

PhD Student '22, Human Paleobiology

"The CASHP environment encourages collaboration, and I have had the opportunity, both inside and outside of class, to learn things from my friends who conduct research across a wide variety of fields."


Follow Us